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Take a classic Savannah stroll with barbershop musical

By Joshua Peacock/SMN
A “barbershop musical” on June 16 at Tybee Post Theater, helmed by the 13th Colony Sound, is a transformative concert that will take patrons on a stroll through a quaint 1950s Savannah.

Formed in 1968, Savannah’s 13th Colony Sound has been on a brief hiatus. Their last full production, a number of years ago, celebrated Savannah. Richard Towns, one of only two remaining original members, went to a show at the newly restored Tybee Post Theater recently and thought the venue would be a great place to revive an abbreviated version of the barbershop choir’s last production.

“This is going to be all about Savannah,” Towns said. Read more ….

Tybee City Limits returns

Abe Partridge and The Train Wrecks offer raw Americana/country at Post Theater
By Anna Chandler/Connect Savannah
It’s back! Tybee City Limits continues to showcase local and touring talent at the historic Tybee Post Theater. For June’s performance, Savannah’s own The Train Wrecks will join Alabama singer-songwriter Abe Partridge.

The Train Wrecks remain one of Savannah’s favorite groups—Connect Savannah readers just voted the band Best Local Americana/Folk/Roots Band in the 2018 Best of Savannah Awards.

Mobile, Alabama’s Abe Partridge comes to town with a highly-lauded new album, Cotton Fields and Blood for Days, released in January 2018.

Partridge grew up with a piano-playing mother, eventually finding solace in the raw rock of Nirvana. After graduating high school, he studied at Bible College, graduated, and became the understudy of an Appalachian preacher. He began finding the spiritual blues of players like Robert Johnson and Son House before rethinking life, joining the military, and working as an avionics tech on C-130s.

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Now, Partridge is one of his home state’s most in-demand songwriters, fusing the spirit of punk and the deep narrative quality of Southern musical tradition. With ragged vocals landing somewhere between Lucero’s Ben Nichols and Drive-By Truckers’ Patterson Hood, Partridge is a captivating writer and performer. Though Cotton Fields and Blood for Days is a mere eight songs, each punches listeners in the heart and leaves a mark.

For his return to Tybee Post Theater, Partridge will be accompanied by cellist Courtney Blackwell.

We talked with the singer-songwriter about his new album, his early performance days, and establishing a connection with his listeners.

Coming off of the release of your first record, what was it like writing for Cotton Fields & Blood For Days?

The second record kind of came about, honestly, as an accident. I’m a songwriter—I don’t really specifically write for records. I was just hanging out in Nashville with a producer friend of mine…we were going to record a 7″ with the song “Colors” and “Alabama Blues.” It just kind of progressed from there, and the next thing you know, I had a full record’s worth of material.

What was the process like in choosing what material to use?

I play a whole lot of shows, and in my shows I kind of feel out what the audience likes. The songs that get the best response when I’m playing live are usually the ones that end up on the record.

You’ve been playing out since 2015—you had quite the very first show.

Yeah! So I played a songwriter contest in Gulf Shores, Alabama in October 2015, and that was the first time I had the gall to really play anything I had written in front of anybody. I ended up winning that night and meeting this other guy who was a contestant and we’ve become best friends. He’s produced both of my records—it’s kind of magic.

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The Train Wrecks’ Jason Bible
The Train Wrecks’ Jason Bible
How has performing changed for you since then?

I’ve just gotten better. I played The Listening Room here in Mobile, my hometown, play it once a month and I’m learning how to interact with audiences. I’m making sure the stories and lyrics are getting heard. I’m trying to communitate, trying to take music to the level, take my songs to a place where they are communicative more than trying to communicate a message. They tell a story…mainly, what I’ve grown in is trying to do that.

How do you try to connect with people in lyric and tone?

I never took a class on songwriting and I’m probably doing it all wrong. But I was a preacher for a long time, and that’s kind of I guess where I’m coming from when I write songs. I don’t have the same message I always had, but every song contains some type of truth, some type of emotion. I just try to put in a lyric that is easily grasped.

You had some great guests on this record. What was it like to take those solo songs and make full-bodied, recorded tracks?

Primarily, I play solo…Courtney Blackwell plays cello with me, we’ve hit the road a lot. But hearing your songs surrounded by a band of confident players really takes them all to a different level. It’s almost a spiritual experience when you’re able to hear these songs and find them toned up.

You’re doing this while still being in the military?

Yep, I’ve got my military boots on right now! I’m an Air Force reservist. I work for the Air Force during the week, I’m not an active member but I work at a job as an Air Reserve Technician.

How’s it been working with Skate Mountain Records? You were one of their early artists.

Yeah, it’s run by Scott and Kate Lumpkin, they’re longtime filmmakers and movie producers and they started a record label a couple years back. I was their fourth or fifth addition, and they’ve been wonderful. I’ve gotten my music to a much broader audience and it helped me get into that next-next echelon of touring. I’m still trying to progress to the point I can be full-time, but I’m definitely a lot further down the road to that goal than I was before Skate Mountain.

What are you working on, do you have a lot coming up this summer?

Oh boy do I ever! I am working on something all the time. I’m painting a whole lot—I create visual art that has really taken off, I’ve sold 22 paintings. That’s been good. I’m putting my punk rock band back together, we’re doing some punk shows, I don’t know if it’s going to be anything to tour with in the future. I’m just kind of branching out and experimenting with digital loops and stuff. I always got my hands on something! I’ll probably be recording another electric album in the line of Cotton Fields and Blood For Days. Hopefully I’ll have another record out through Skate Mountain.

CS
Tags: Music Features, Tybee City Limits, Abe Partridge, Train Wrecks, Tybee Post Theater

Tybee City Limits

Tybee Post Theater

Saturday, June 9, 8 p.m.

$15 for adults, $5 for children via tybeeposttheater.com

Jane Ogle and Southern Holiday Jazz Band bring Billie Holiday to Tybee Sat. Feb. 3

By Christopher Berinato/SMN
Tybee Post Theater continues its popular Jazz Legends Series with a tribute to Lady Day.

The songs of Billie Holiday are brought to life in “Billie on Tybee!” featuring singer Jane Ogle and the Southern Holiday Jazz Band. Ogle has been performing this show since 2013, and her current band includes Robert Britton Saunders on drums, Marc Chesanow on upright bass and Judy Duva on piano.
Holiday changed jazz music during her career from the 1930s through the ’50s with a unique, uncompromising and emotional vocal style, and her influence can still be felt in music today. Read more ….

‘Southern Songbirds’ showcases Georgia natives Caroline Aiken and Jill Knight

By Joshua Peacock/SMN
The “Southern Songbirds” showcase at Tybee Post Theater on Jan. 26 will feature two veteran singer-songwriters and Georgia natives returning to their old stomping grounds.

Caroline Aiken and Jill Knight both got their start busking on River Street in Savannah, along with clubs all around the Lowcountry and Georgia. Over their three decades of songwriting, the two have shared stages, and individually played with the likes of Muddy Waters, Doc Watson, Bonnie Raitt, The Indigo Girls, John Prine and India Arie. Read more:

‘Ken’ revival coming to Tybee Post Theater

By Joshua Peacock/SMN

From initial concept to the final product, construction of an original play is a long and arduous process.

Over 18 months ago, Stratton Leopold approached Tom Coleman III with an idea for an original play. “Ken” is based on a short story by Arnold Sundaard published in the New Yorker in 1959. A year ago, the play debuted at Tybee Post Theater to sold-out audiences. Read more ….

Cash Unchained tribute show rolls through Tybee

By Joshua Peacock/SMN

James Tamelcoff never set out to be Johnny Cash, but by paying tribute to the original outlaw, he’s beginning to find his own voice.

The young Virginia musician was cutting his teeth in his local music scene almost two years ago, playing with several bands and covering different artists. Someone suggested to him that he should put together a Johnny Cash tribute show, due to his uncanny vocal resemblance to the Man in Black. Read more….

Polar brrrr: 2018 Tybee Polar Plunge benefits Post Theater

By Christopher Berinato/SMN

The legendary Phoenix may purge itself in fire to begin anew, but there is no need to be so dramatic. A brisk dip in the Atlantic Ocean works just as well to start the New Year right.

The 2018 Tybee Polar Plunge offers a fun opportunity for friends and families to take the icy challenge, with proceeds going to support the beloved Tybee Post Theater.

Thousands of participants are expected to take the mad dash into the water Jan. 1. The popular event kicks off with the Gang of Goofs costume contest and parade at 11 a.m. …Read more.

The donkey is “The Star” at the Post

By Jim Reed/SMN

In the Tybee Post Theater’s three-day engagement of the just-released, Christmas-themed CGI feature “The Star,” all sorts of Hollywood types can be found voicing characters in this comedic re-imagining of the tale of Jesus’ birth — including “The Walking Dead” alum Steven Yeun, Kegan-Michael Key of “Key & Peele” and even sassy-frassy pop singer Kelly Clarkson. What makes this film unique from others dealing with the whole “away in a manger” story? Well, this one is told from… wait for it… the perspective of one of the donkeys on hand, as opposed to a wise man or even a passing haberdasher.

Both critics and viewers are split on whether “The Star” is any better than average as far as such animated flicks go, but word on the street is that kids dig it. Which is really all that matters, right? Plus, the Tybee Post has heat! 7 p.m. showtimes on Thursday, Friday and Sunday, with an added 3 p.m. matinee that final day. Admission prices to all Film Scene events can be found in our accompanying sidebar listings. Read More:

No Ordinary Love: Danielle Hicks Sings Sade @Tybee Post Theater

By Anna Chandler/ConnectSavannah

Savannah vocalist, songwriter, and band leader Danielle Hicks honors the music of legendary English jazz group Sade this weekend. With hits like “Smooth Operator,” “By Your Side,” “The Sweetest Taboo,” and “No Ordinary Love,” the music of vocalist Sade Adu is timeless, and Hicks will bring her own unique flavor to the familiar favorites.

Hicks is joined by her band, The Resistance, for this one-of-a-kind performance.

Friday, December 8, 8 p.m., $15, all-ages

Malcolm Holcombe’s Pretty Little Troubles

Singer-songwriter returns to Savannah with new album

By Anna Chandler/ConnectSavannah

THE VOICE of Appalachia will resonate through Tybee Post Theater this weekend.

Singer-songwriter Malcolm Holcombe brings his timeless, Southern-steeped sound back to Savannah. The North Carolinian has spent his career capturing the character and cracks of his Blue Ridge Mountain home, spinning stories of callused hands, struggles, and seasoned experience with a warmly ragged voice and authentic, spellbinding poeticism.

Born in Asheville and raised in Weaverville, North Carolina, Holcombe played as a member of several regional bands as a young man, shifting into a solo career later on. Later, he teamed up to perform in a trio with Ray Sisk and released an album, Trademark, in Sam Milner.

The 1990s found Holcombe in Nashville; in 1996, after performing at countless open mic nights, he signed with Geffen Records. He released his debut record, A Hundred Lies, in 1999 through Hip-O Records.

Over the years, he has released 13 total solo albums, composed for Jonah Smith and Jonathan Edwards, and contributed to several compilations. Throughout his career, Holcombe has shared the stage with performers like Merle Haggard, Leon Russell, Cat Power, Richard Thompson, Wilco, Shelby Lynne, and more.

Currently, Holcombe is touring in support of his latest album, Pretty Little Troubles, released on April 7, 2017 through Gypsy Eyes Music.

Holcombe entrusted Darrell Scott, a friend of around 27 years, to produce the record. A prolific singer-songwriter and member of Robert Plant’s Band of Joy, Scott offered a keen eye and trusted intuition for the project.

“I just wanted some camaraderie with brains,” Holcombe says of the collaboration. “We’d just pick each other’s brains, hang out, sit and play some music, and have a good time. We’re friends. We work together when we can and try to exist on the planet like everybody else. We got together, Darrell brought the engineer, we did some pickin’, and we just tried to put some chords to these baby dolls.”

“We’re all songwriters,” he continues. “Everybody’s a songwriter. And we’re all storytellers, even the old cave paintings. That’s about what we’re doing these days–making up stories, trying to keep each other on the planet. Some of are trying to hep each other while the other ones are destroying each other. It’s a yin and yang thing, the good, the bad, and the ugly.”

Pretty Little Troubles unique, shadowy Americana is flush with banjo, violin, Celtic musings, and bluesy moments. A master storyteller, Holcombe creates a portrait of the hardships of his home over the album’s twelve tracks.

Holcombe wrote the contents of Pretty Little Troubles over the course of a few months.

“I would get up every morning, chain smoke, drink coffee, and go from there,” he says of his process. “I eat a couple eggs, try to get out of bed, open my eyes, and take it from there.”

He credits his wife with selecting the album’s centerpiece song as its title track.

“She’s a god title picker,” he attests. “I always bounce ideas off of her. It’s good to have someone you trust grease the frying pan a little bit, you know, trying to cook up an idea.”

Holcombe looks forward to returning to Savannah, where he’ll take the stage with Jason Bible of The Train Wrecks.

“I’m looking forward to it,” he says. “My wife’s coming with me — we love the area.”

Family Movies

Summer Movies Series sponsored by First Chatham Bank

Upcoming Events
  1. Underhill Rose

    June 29 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  2. Salute to Southern Rock

    June 30 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  3. Tybee City Limits: Eric Culberson Band, Kris Youmans Band

    July 7 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  4. Grateful Dead Presented by the Charlie Fog Band

    July 21 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  5. Randall Bramblett

    August 4 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  6. Satisfaction

    September 1 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  7. Malcolm Holcombe

    September 8 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm


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